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Flag of Monaco 2019 Monaco E-Prix
Monaco Layout 2019
The shortened Circuit de Monaco returned in 2019.
Race Information
Date 11 May 2019[1]
E-Prix No. {{{number}}}
Official Name 2019 ABB FIA Formula E Monaco E-Prix
Location Flag of Monaco Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo, Monaco
Lap length 1.760 km (1.090 mi)
Distance 51 laps / 89.760 km (55.774 mi)
Support Race Flag of Monaco 2019 Monaco eTrophy Race
Qualifying Result
Pole Sitter Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Rowland
Team Flag of France Nissan e.Dams
Time 0:50.021
Fastest Lap
Driver Flag of Germany Pascal Wehrlein
Team Flag of India Mahindra Racing
Fastest Lap 0:52.385 on lap 46
ePrix Result
First Second Third
Flag of France Jean-Éric Vergne Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Rowland Flag of Brazil Felipe Massa
Winner Team Flag of China DS Techeetah
Time 46:05.547
ePrix Guide
Previous Next
Flag of France 2019 Paris E-Prix Flag of Germany 2019 Berlin E-Prix
Post-Race Test

The 2019 ABB FIA Formula E Monaco E-Prix, otherwise known simply as the 2019 Monaco E-Prix, was the ninth round of the 2018/19 ABB FIA Formula E Championship, staged at the Circuit de Monaco in Monte Carlo on the 9 May 2019.[1] The E-Prix was held on a shortened version of the Grand Prix circuit, after attempts to run on the full circuit were abandoned earlier in the season.[2]

Qualifying would see Oliver Rowland claim his third pole position of the campaign, although a grid penalty carried over from the Paris E-Prix meant that he would start from third.[3] Jean-Éric Vergne would therefore start the race from pole, while Pascal Wehrlein inherited second after Mitch Evans also picked up a grid penalty.[3]

Vergne aced his start to hold the lead into Sainte Devote, going very defensive to prevent Wehrlein from sneaking inside the tight right hander.[4] Rowland, meanwhile, would almost manage to squeeze past the German, who had to go around the outside of the first corner, while André Lotterer shot up to seventeenth as the field bunched up on the brakes.[4]

The race quickly settled into a typical Monaco procession, with Vergne easing ahead of Wehrlein, Rowland and Felipe Massa, while Sébastien Buemi tried to go with them.[4] Indeed, Buemi would be the first driver to arm Attack Mode in an attempt to pass Massa's Venturi Formula E Team, but ultimately fell back when the Brazilian fended off his efforts.[4]

As they fought Wehrlein made his first mistake of the weekend, braking marginally too late for Sainte Devote and hence slid wide.[4] Rowland and Massa instantly took advantage to claim second and third, leaving the German to fend off Buemi for fourth into turn three.[4]

Buemi would remain the centre of attention for the majority of the race, the Swiss ace simply lacking the pace of Vergne and co. up front.[4] He duly became a major road block for everyone down to Sam Bird in thirteenth, with several drivers making ground in his train.[4]

Indeed Bird and Lucas di Grassi were in fine form, and duly moved through to eighth and ninth from the back of the train.[4] Indeed, it was only when they came to fight with the two BMW-Andrettis that their charge was halted, with Sims inadvertently side-swiping di Grassi at turn three, ending the Brazilian's race.[4]

Sims was involved in another accident later on during the race, tangling with Championship leader Robin Frijns at Sainte Devote to leave the Dutchman out with heavy damage.[4] Fortunately swift work from the marshals ensured that no late safety car was required, leaving two minutes on the clock as Vergne began to struggle with energy consumption.[4]

Indeed, as the field started the final lap Vergne was on the verge of running out of energy, having barely enough to make it to the line.[4] Rowland duly tried everything he could to pass the Frenchman or force him to run out, but ultimately fell shy as they charged across the line.[4] Massa was in a similar position in third, but just managed to cross the line as his energy reserve ticked to zero, leaving Wehrlein in fourth.[4]

Background

Round nine of the 2018/19 ABB FIA Formula E Championship saw the field return to Monte Carlo, which had last hosted an E-Prix in 2017.[1] Indeed, the field would use the circuit first established for FE in 2015, having initially planned to use the full Circuit de Monaco after the switch to the Spark SRT05e.[5] However, the FIA were not keen on having FE cars run on the same circuit as Formula One, and so vetoed the switch to prevent direct comparisons between the two series.[2]

World Wanderings

The Monaco E-Prix was heralded by news that Formula E Holdings had applied to the FIA to grant Formula E World Championship status, beginning from the 2020/21 campaign.[6] FEH had made a long term plan to establish the series as a World Championship, and believed that if had fulfilled all of the FIA's criteria to be classified as such.[6] The plan was backed by the Formula E Teams & Manufacturers Association, led by Jaguar Racing team director James Barclay, with the series fulfilling the FIA's criteria of having four competing manufacturers with races across five continents.[6]

Such a move would ensure that FE would become the fifth FIA sanctioned World Championship, joining Formula One, the World Endurance Championship, FIA World Rallycross and the FIA World Rally Championship.[6]

Championship Conditions

Victory in Paris had propelled Robin Frijns into the lead of the 2018/19 ABB FIA Formula E Championship, the Dutchman having become the eighth different winner in eight E-Prix. Frijns had left Paris a point ahead of André Lotterer in second, one of only two drivers not to have a win in the top ten, before a ten point gap back to António Félix da Costa in third. Lucas di Grassi was next, level with da Costa on 70 points, while Jérôme d'Ambrosio had slipped to fifth.

In the Teams' Championship it was still advantage DS Techeetah at the head of the field arriving in Monaco, the French-Chinese alliance leaving Paris with 142 points to their name. Yet, they were only seven ahead of second placed Envision Virgin Racing, the only team in the field with two wins, while Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler had moved into third. The German squad themselves had made progress in Paris, having overtaken Mahindra Racing as they moved just thirteen off the lead, as GEOX DRAGON moved off the foot of the table with only their second points finish of the campaign.

Entry List

The full entry list for the 2019 Monaco E-Prix is displayed below:

2019 Monaco E-Prix Entry List
No. Name Entrant Constructor Car
2 Flag of the United Kingdom Sam Bird Flag of the United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing Audi e-tron FE05
3 Flag of the United Kingdom Alex Lynn Flag of the United Kingdom Panasonic Jaguar Racing Jaguar I-Type III
4 Dutch Flag Robin Frijns Flag of the United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing Audi e-tron FE05
5 Flag of Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne Flag of Germany HWA Racelab Venturi VFE 05
6 Flag of Germany Maximilian Günther Flag of the United States GEOX Dragon Penske EV-3
7 Flag of Argentina José María López Flag of the United States GEOX Dragon Penske EV-3
8 Flag of France Tom Dillmann Flag of the United Kingdom NIO Formula E Team NIO Sport 004
11 Flag of Brazil Lucas di Grassi Flag of Germany Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler Audi e-tron FE05
16 Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Turvey Flag of the United Kingdom NIO Formula E Team NIO Sport 004
17 Flag of the United Kingdom Gary Paffett Flag of Germany HWA Racelab Venturi VFE 05
19 Flag of Brazil Felipe Massa Flag of Monaco Venturi Formula E Team Venturi VFE 05
20 Flag of New Zealand Mitch Evans Flag of the United Kingdom Panasonic Jaguar Racing Jaguar I-Type III
22 Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Rowland Flag of France Nissan e.Dams Nissan IM01
23 Flag of Switzerland Sébastien Buemi Flag of France Nissan e.Dams Nissan IM01
25 Flag of France Jean-Éric Vergne Flag of China DS Techeetah DS E-Tense FE 19
27 Flag of the United Kingdom Alexander Sims Flag of Germany BMW i Andretti Motorsport BMW iFE.18
28 Flag of Portugal António Félix da Costa Flag of Germany BMW i Andretti Motorsport BMW iFE.18
36 Flag of Germany André Lotterer Flag of China Techeetah DS E-Tense FE 19
48 Flag of Switzerland Edoardo Mortara Flag of Monaco Venturi Formula E Team Venturi VFE 05
64 Flag of Belgium Jérôme d'Ambrosio Flag of India Mahindra Racing Mahindra M5Electro
66 Flag of Germany Daniel Abt Flag of Germany Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler Audi e-tron FE05
94 Flag of Germany Pascal Wehrlein Flag of India Mahindra Racing Mahindra M5Electro
Source:[7]

Practice

FP1

FP2

Qualifying

Qualifying for the Monaco E-Prix would follow the conventional format, with the field split into four groups based on Championship position.[8] Each group would get six minutes on circuit to allow each driver to set a single full power (250kw) lap, with the fastest six over all proceeding to Super Pole.[8] The drivers in Super Pole would then head out one-by-one to set another flying lap, with the fastest of those starting the race from pole.[8]

Group 1

The opening group for the Monaco E-Prix would feature those at the top of the Championship hunt, led by Championship leader Robin Frijns in his Envision Virgin run Audi.[8] He would be joined by the factory Audi of Lucas di Grassi, was well as António Félix da Costa and Jérôme d'Ambrosio in their race winning cars as well.[8] Completing the group would be André Lotterer, who was the only one of the opening quartet yet to score a race victory in 2018/19.[8]

Lotterer was the first out onto the circuit, with all of the opening group opting to complete a warm-up lap before their one flying lap at full power.[9] Lotterer was therefore the first driver to set a time, with a brush against the wall through the Swimming Pool ensuring that his time was vulnerable to those behind.[9] Indeed, d'Ambrosio would instantly beat the German's time a few seconds later, only to be toppled himself when di Grassi flashed across the line, having survived a small lock-up into Sainte Devote.[9]

Next across the line was da Costa, who duly went to the top of the standings with a 50.375, three quarters of a second faster that Lotterer's earlier run.[9] Frijns followed the Portuguese ace across the line but could only muster a lap good enough for second, although with track evolution set to be a major factor as usual none of the group one attendees were expecting to get into Super Pole.[9]

Group 2

The second group of the day featured five drivers whom arrived in Monte Carlo just outside of the top five, headlined by defending Champion Jean-Éric Vergne in his DS Techeetah.[8] He would be joined by his main challenger from 2017/18 Sam Bird, as well as the second factory Audi of Daniel Abt, who had a mixed start to the season.[8] Completing the group would be Paris race winner Mitch Evans in his Jaguar, as well as Hong Kong conqueror Edoardo Mortara in the first of the four Venturis.[8]

Mortara was the first to go from the quintet, with all five opting to complete a warm-up lap as the opening group had done.[9] The Swiss racer's lap was ultimately a scruffy one, with a clatter against the kerbs in turn three essentially costing him time throughout the middle sector.[9] He did, however, manage to beat Lotterer's earlier time, having also brushed the barriers, although he was instantly moved down the order as Vergne set the pace with a 50.048.[9]

Abt duly knocked Mortara out of Super Pole a few moments later, although he was a surprise sixth at the end of his seemingly clean run around the Principality.[9] Next up was Evans who slotted into second, having set the fastest middle sector of the session to that point, while Bird rounded out the group in sixth, having messed up his preparation by running too close to the back of Evans during his warm-up lap.[9]

Group 3

The first sextet of the afternoon would see those beginning to slip away from the title fight hit the circuit, featuring drivers positioned eleventh through to sixteenth in the Championship.[8] Headlining the group was quali-ace Sébastien Buemi, who was unbeaten around the Monegasque streets in both qualifying and the race.[8] He would be joined by Nissan e.Dams teammate Oliver Rowland, F1 refugees Stoffel Vandoorne and Pascal Wehrlein, as well as Alexander Sims and Felipe Massa of BMW-Andretti and Venturi respectively.[8]

The first driver to hit the circuit in group three would be Sims, who caused a small shock by heading out very early on in hopes of guaranteeing some free track.[9] Unfortunately for him his ploy would not work entirely well, with small mistakes in Sainte Devote and the Swimming Pool leaving him in third on a 50.351.[9] A few minutes later and Rowland proved that small margins were to be crucial in Monte Carlo, going second overall having just clipped the kerbs too heavily at turn three, with Vandoorne crossing the line behind him to claim sixth overall.[9]

Next across the line was Massa, who, essentially on home soil, delivered the best lap of his FE career to that point, grabbing second overall to knock Vandoorne in the sister car out of Super Pole.[9] Wehrlein was next and looked set to go fastest overall with the fastest first sector of the session, only for a slide in the Swimming Pool to leave him 0.010s behind Vergne at the end of the lap.[9] Buemi, meanwhile, put together a solid if unspectacular run to claim fourth overall, knocking Sims out of the Super Pole slots to conclude the third group's time on track.[9]

Group 4

The final group of the session featured those positioned seventeenth or lower in the Championship, whose only real advantage heading into qualifying was how the track had evolved.[8] Regardless, a couple of the drivers were a threat to Super Pole based on form, with the two GEOX DRAGONs of José María López and Maximilian Günther, as well as Gary Paffett in his HWA having recent experience of sneaking a spot in the shootout.[8] They would be joined by Alex Lynn in the second Jaguar, still getting used to driving the Spark SRT05e, as well as the two off-pace NIOs of Oliver Turvey and Tom Dillmann.[8]

Dillmann was the first to venture out of the pits from the second sextet, leaving with two and a half minutes on the clock as the rest of the group flooded onto the track behind him.[9] Unfortunately for Dillmann a potential top-ten run was ruined by a lock-up into Rascasse, which ensured that he recorded a lowly effort of 50.811, leaving him just ahead of Lotterer at the back of the pack.[9] He was followed across the line by Günther, who claimed twelfth, with Paffett the next man across the line to claim seventeenth with a relatively poor effort.[9]

A few moments later and Lynn charged across the line to grab eighth, with the Brit likely having lost a significant amount of time having clipped several kerbs throughout his lap.[9] He was followed by López who rounded out the session in tenth, recording a 50.432 to leave the top covered by a third of a second ahead of the shootout.[9]

Super Pole

First out onto the circuit was Evans, who produced an ultra clean effort to record a 50.112, over a tenth faster than he had managed in the group stages having got a better run through the Swimming Pool.[9] Rowland went next and duly improved upon Evans' run, being marginally neater overall, barring a small twitch through the Swimming Pool, to record a 50.021.[9] His teammate Buemi followed him onto the circuit, but his fate was sealed by a twitch on turn-in into Sainte Devote, meaning the Swiss ace could only muster a 50.234, two tenths off the ultimate pace.[9]

F1 veteran Massa was next to hit the circuit, with a strong effort seeing the Brazilian go third fastest with a 50.218, having lost most of the time to Rowland courtesy of a rear lock-up into turn three.[9] A very late Wehrlein was next, just as it was revealed that Evans was under investigation for a breach of Super Pole "procedure", with the German losing time with a wide run through Sainte Devote, as well as devious twitches through Tabac and the final corner, leaving him in third on a 50.128.[9] Completing the shootout was defending Champion Vergne, who was out to claim pole position having missed out on the chance for a true home victory in Paris.[9]

Surprisingly Vergne would take a cautious approach to the start of his lap, although miraculously the Frenchman would emerge from the first sector half a tenth up on Rowland's earlier effort.[9] Yet, the Frenchman would bleed a small amount of time in the second sector, ultimately leaving him in second on a 50.042, just 0.021s off of Evans' effort.[9] Evans therefore claimed the points for pole position, although his three place grid drop ensured that Vergne would physically start the race from pole position.[9]

Post Qualifying

After qualifying it was found that Evans had activated his qualifying mode 0.4s too early during Super Pole, an issue that earned him a reprimand.[10] While that did not carry a grid penalty in itself, the fact that it was Evans' third reprimand of the season meant that he was slapped with a ten place grid penalty, dumping him back to twelfth on the grid.[10] That meant that Rowland moved back to third after his penalty was applied, while Wehrlein moved onto the front row.[10]

The final qualifying result for the 2019 Monaco E-Prix are outlined below:

2019 Monaco E-Prix Qualifying Result
Pos. No. Name Team Time Gap Grid Group
1st* 22 Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Rowland Flag of France Nissan e.Dams 0:50.021 3 G3
2nd 25 Flag of France Jean-Éric Vergne Flag of China DS Techeetah 0:50.042 +0.021s 1 G2
3rd 20 Flag of New Zealand Mitch Evans Flag of the United Kingdom Jaguar Racing 0:50.112 +0.091s 12 G2
4th 94 Flag of Germany Pascal Wehrlein Flag of India Mahindra Racing 0:50.128 +0.107s 2 G3
5th 19 Flag of Brazil Felipe Massa Flag of Monaco Venturi Formula E Team 0:50.218 +0.197s 4 G3
6th 23 Flag of Switzerland Sébastien Buemi Flag of France Nissan e.Dams 0:50.234 +0.213s 5 G3
Super Pole
1st 25 Flag of France Jean-Éric Vergne Flag of China DS Techeetah 0:50.048 SP G2
2nd 94 Flag of Germany Pascal Wehrlein Flag of India Mahindra Racing 0:50.058 +0.010s SP G3
3rd 19 Flag of Brazil Felipe Massa Flag of Monaco Venturi Formula E Team 0:50.090 +0.042s SP G3
4th 23 Flag of Switzerland Sébastien Buemi Flag of France Nissan e.Dams 0:50.140 +0.092s SP G3
5th 22 Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Rowland Flag of France Nissan e.Dams 0:50.161 +0.113s SP G3
6th 20 Flag of New Zealand Mitch Evans Flag of the United Kingdom Jaguar Racing 0:50.247 +0.199s SP G2
7th 27 Flag of the United Kingdom Alexander Sims Flag of the United States BMW i Andretti Motorsport 0:50.351 +0.303s 6 G3
8th 3 Flag of the United Kingdom Alex Lynn Flag of the United Kingdom Jaguar Racing 0:50.370 +0.322s 7 G4
9th 28 Flag of Portugal António Félix da Costa Flag of the United States BMW i Andretti Motorsport 0:50.375 +0.327s 8 G1
10th 7 Flag of Argentina José María López Flag of the United States GEOX DRAGON 0:50.432 +0.384s 9 G4
11th 5 Flag of Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne Flag of Germany HWA Racelab 0:50.451 +0.403s 10 G3
12th 4 Dutch Flag Robin Frijns Flag of the United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing 0:50.498 +0.450s 11 G1
13th 11 Flag of Brazil Lucas di Grassi Flag of Germany Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler 0:50.502 +0.454s 13 G1
14th 6 Flag of Germany Maximilian Günther Flag of the United States GEOX DRAGON 0:50.514 +0.466s 22 G4
15th 2 Flag of the United Kingdom Sam Bird Flag of the United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing 0:50.526 +0.478s 14 G2
16th 16 Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Turvey Flag of the United Kingdom NIO Formula E Team 0:50.578 +0.530s 15 G4
17th* 64 Flag of Belgium Jérôme d'Ambrosio Flag of India Mahindra Racing 0:50.601 +0.553s 19 G1
18th 66 Flag of Germany Daniel Abt Flag of Germany Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler 0:50.602 +0.554s 16 G2
19th* 48 Flag of Switzerland Edoardo Mortara Flag of Monaco Venturi Formula E Team 0:50.618 +0.570s 21 G2
20th 17 Flag of the United Kingdom Gary Paffett Flag of Germany HWA Racelab 0:50.664 +0.616s 17 G4
21st 8 Flag of France Tom Dillmann Flag of the United Kingdom NIO Formula E Team 0:50.811 +0.763s 18 G4
22nd 36 Flag of Germany André Lotterer Flag of China DS Techeetah 0:51.018 +0.970s 20 G1
110% Time: 0:55.052[7]
Source:[7]
  • * d'Ambrosio, Mortara and Rowland were all awarded three place grid penalties for causing collisions at the 2019 Paris E-Prix.[11]
  • Evans and Günther handed ten place grid penalties for obtaining their third reprimands of the season.[10]

Race

Race afternoon in Monte Carlo was bright and warm, meaning drivers would have to keep an eye on battery temperatures in what was set to be a flat-out race from lights to flag.[12] Otherwise there would be no pre-race concerns for those at the head of the field, although post-qualifying grid penalties had shuffled the starting grid somewhat to leave Jean-Éric Vergne on pole.[12] Regardless, the Frenchman would smartly pull into his inherited grid slot without issue from the dummy grid, knowing that the run into Sainte Devote would be crucial to his race.[12]

Report

Ultimately Vergne would get a good launch off the grid, although he still felt the need to sweep to the inside of the circuit to prevent Pascal Wehrlein from sending a dive into Sainte Devote.[12] They were chased hard by Oliver Rowland and Felipe Massa, with the rest of the field making it through the legendary first corner without issue, barring the usual rubbing.[12] Indeed, Sébastien Buemi would wait until the field poured into turn three before trying a move, although his lunge inside Rowland and Massa saw him skate wide on exit and slip back to his original fifth place.[12]

Their squabble on the opening lap allowed Vergne and Wehrlein to break clear at the end of the opening tour, as André Lotterer pulled an excellent move on Daniel Abt for seventeenth, driving right around the outside of the German at Rascasse.[12] Rowland, meanwhile, would keep Massa and Buemi at bay during the early stages, prompting Buemi to arm his Attack Mode on lap five after a couple of minutes spent stuck in fifth.[12] Lotterer, meanwhile, would also be an early adopter of Attack Mode, although when his car refused to arm the system when he crossed the sensor lines.[12]

Back with Buemi and the Swiss ace was hounding the back of Massa, sending two lunges around the outside of the Brazilian on lap eight, prompting the Brazilian to take Attack Mode on the very same lap.[12] Rowland, meanwhile, would wait an additional lap before arming his own boost, with all three beginning to catch Wehrlein as the German dropped back from Vergne.[12] Indeed, Wehrlein seemed to be struggling with the balance of his Mahindra as the race developed, resulting in more and more minor mistakes.[12]

Those mistakes ultimately told on lap ten, when a lock-up into Sainte Devote sent the German skating wide, allowing Rowland to sneak through into second, with Massa getting alongside on exit.[12] The Brazilian duly eased ahead of Wehrlein on the brakes for turn three, with the German racer just managing to keep Buemi at bay before arming Attack Mode for the first time later in the lap.[12] All of that would, however, allow Vergne to escape a little further up the road, meaning the Frenchman could dedicate more time to energy conservation until Rowland and co. caught back up to the #25 DS Techeetah.[12]

The race clammed down for a short while after that, with Alexander Sims pushing hard to catch the lead group as they inched onto the back of a comfortable Vergne up front.[12] Indeed, it was only as Buemi began to slip back that there would be any entertainment, with Sims sending a dive around the outside of the Nissan e.Dams into Sainte Devote on lap fourteen, although that was easily swatted aside.[12] However, that attempted lunge would allow those behind Sims to catch right onto the Brit's tail, resulting in a queue of eight cars running nose-to-tail from fifth placed Buemi to Sam Bird in twelfth.[12]

Bird would, however, be otherwise occupied at the back of that particular pack, having to defend from an Attack Mode boosted Mitch Evans, as Sims tried another lunge at Buemi for fifth.[12] Vergne, meanwhile, would opt to arm his Attack Mode boost to escape the increasing attentions of Rowland, Massa and Wehrlein, while Alex Lynn harassed Sims for sixth as the Brit re-grouped from his latest attack on Buemi.[12] That failed attempt from Lynn would, however, leave him vulnerable to attack from António Félix da Costa out of Sainte Devote, who duly drove right around the outside of the Brit at turn three to claim seventh.[12]

A lap later and Sims diligently let his teammate through to sixth, knowing that da Costa was in a far better position in terms of the Championship then he was arriving in Monte Carlo.[12] Unsurprisingly, da Costa would immediately go on to attack Buemi knowing he had a rear-gunner behind him, with the Portuguese ace sending another lunge into turn three, although Buemi was wise to the move.[12] They would continue to squabble for the following laps as, out front, Rowland inched closer to the back of Vergne once the Frenchman's Attack Mode boost ran out.[12]

Onto lap 24 and with half-distance fast approaching Stoffel Vandoorne tried a dive on Lynn into turn three for eighth, only for the Brit to swat the Belgian's attack aside.[12] That allowed Lucas di Grassi to get a run on the #5 HWA Racelab into Tabac, only for Bird to get the nose of his Envision Virgin inside the factory Audi, granting him tenth.[12] Bird duly went on to send a lunge at Vandoorne into turn one on the very next lap, grabbing ninth, with di Grassi following him through as Vandoorne had a poor run out of the corner having been forced wide by the Virgin.[12]

Indeed, it seemed as if Bird and di Grassi were working together, for Bird would repeat his Vandoorne lunge on Lynn a lap later, with di Grassi able to follow him through on the run to turn three.[12] That left them in eighth and ninth, with Lynn ultimately falling to a dive from Vandoorne into turn three on the following lap that completely destroyed his momentum.[12] Robin Frijns and Mitch Evans duly passed the Brit into Tabac, with contact between Lynn and the former leaving the #3 Jaguar with a damaged from wing.[12]

Lynn's wing would completely fail a lap alter as he ran through the Swimming Pool, leaving bits of carbon fibre strewn across the circuit.[12] That likely caused Maximilian Günther to pick-up a puncture a few moments later, with the German having to abandon his car at the final corner having been unable to get around the tight right hander.[12] He duly parked in the escape road at Anthony Noghes, meaning that a Full Course Yellow was required to allow his GEOX DRAGON to be removed from the circuit, as well as allow Lynn's front wing to be removed from the Swimming Pool section.[12]

The race resumed with twenty minutes to go, with Rowland acing his restart to draw right onto the back of Vergne and challenge for the lead.[12] Behind, da Costa would also have a beautifully timed restart, sweeping to arm Attack Mode in order to harass an out-of-sorts Buemi for fifth, with everyone now having enough energy to complete the race flat-out without major energy concerns.[12] da Costa duly sent two quick dives at Buemi into Sainte Devote and turn three, with Buemi squeezing the Portuguese racer hard in order to prevent the BMW-Andretti getting ahead.[12]

Indeed, da Costa's second lunge into turn three would cause chaos behind, for his teammate Sims had to suddenly jink to the right of the circuit to avoid his teammate's jump on the brakes.[12] That put the Brit right into the path of a charging di Grassi, who was in the midst of sending an ambitious lunge on Bird around the outside of turn three, only for the #27 BMW to slam him into the wall.[12] The Brazilian was left with heavy damage, with di Grassi limping to a stop in a safe place a few moments later, while Sims carried on behind Bird.[12]

Back with the leaders and Rowland had another look at passing Vergne into turn three as time began to run out, while Bird used his second and final Attack Mode boost to pass da Costa for sixth.[12] Elsewhere, Vandoorne managed to get back ahead of Evans using his final few seconds of Attack Mode, only for Evans to dive back past the Belgian into Sainte Devote on the following lap.[12] Frijns duly passed Vandoorne on the run to turn three a few moments later, while Evans went on to lunge inside Sims on the following tour to grab seventh.[12]

Into the final minutes and Bird was defending heavily from da Costa, while their Frijns sent a lunge at Sims into Sainte Devote, only for the Brit to swat his attempt aside.[12] A lap later and Frijns was out of the race entirely, Sims having fed the Dutchman into the barriers on the run to Sainte Devote, leaving Frijns with heavy damage on the outside of the corner.[12] That threatened to bring out another FCY with just two minutes to go, although swift work from the marshals saw the #4 Virgin-Audi plucked from the circuit without interrupting the race.[12]

Onto the final lap and Vergne was working hard to keep Rowland at bay, diving to the inside of the circuit into Sainte Devote to prevent the Brit from sending a lunge.[12] Likewise, Massa was having to put up a ferocious defence to keep Wehrlein at bay for third, with the German running into the back of the Brazilian as they came through turn three, knowing that Massa was critical on energy.[12] Indeed, Massa had started the final lap with just 2% of his energy pool remaining, meaning he was severely at risk of running out of power in his attempts to keep Wehrlein at bay.[12]

Ultimately, however, there would be no late changes to the order out front, with Vergne holding on to claim the victory from Rowland, who was left to rue his collision last time out in Paris that had dropped him from pole position.[12] Behind, Massa just managed to cross the line as his energy ran out, meaning he claimed third, while Wehrlein was frustrated with his small mistake earlier in the race that ultimately cost him second.[12] Elsewhere, Bird would pick-up a puncture on the final lap while in seventh, resulting in him getting stuck and Rascasse and hence plummet out of the points.[12]

Result

The final classification of the 2019 Monaco E-Prix is displayed below, with the fastest lap setter indicated in italics, and the pole sitter shown in bold.

2019 Monaco E-Prix Race Result
Pos. No. Name Team Laps Race Time Fastest lap Pts.
1st 25 Flag of France Jean-Éric Vergne Flag of China DS Techeetah 51 46:05.547 0:52.417 25
2nd 22 Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Rowland Flag of France Nissan e.Dams 51 +0.201s 0:52.690 21
3rd 19 Flag of Brazil Felipe Massa Flag of Monaco Venturi Formula E Team 51 +1.261s 0:52.396 15
4th 94 Flag of Germany Pascal Wehrlein Flag of India Mahindra Racing 51 +1.439s 0:52.385 13
5th 23 Flag of Switzerland Sébastien Buemi Flag of France Nissan e.Dams 51 +6.215s 0:52.585 10
6th 20 Flag of New Zealand Mitch Evans Flag of the United Kingdom Jaguar Racing 51 +16.213s 0:52.429 8
7th 36 Flag of Germany André Lotterer Flag of China DS Techeetah 51 +16.848s 0:52.527 6
8th 3 Flag of the United Kingdom Alex Lynn Flag of the United Kingdom Jaguar Racing 51 +18.112s 0:52.737 4
9th 5 Flag of Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne FanBoosticon Flag of Germany HWA Racelab 51 +18.551s 0:52.710 2
10th 7 Flag of Argentina José María López FanBoosticon Flag of the United States GEOX DRAGON 51 +18.860s 0:52.404 1
11th 64 Flag of Belgium Jérôme d'Ambrosio Flag of India Mahindra Racing 51 +21.488s 0:52.475
12th 17 Flag of the United Kingdom Gary Paffett Flag of Germany HWA Racelab 51 +21.853s 0:52.434
13th* 27 Flag of the United Kingdom Alexander Sims Flag of Germany BMW i Andretti Motorsport 51 +26.934s 0:52.527
14th 8 Flag of France Tom Dillmann Flag of the United Kingdom NIO Formula E Team 51 +31.861s 0:52.698
15th 66 Flag of Germany Daniel Abt FanBoosticon Flag of Germany Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler 51 +49.400s 0:52.460
16th 2 Flag of the United Kingdom Sam Bird Flag of the United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing 50 Damage 0:52.779
17th§ 4 Dutch Flag Robin Frijns Flag of the United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing 46 Collision 0:52.501
DSQƒ 28 Flag of Portugal António Félix da Costa FanBoosticon Flag of Germany BMW i Andretti Motorsport 51 Disqualified 0:52.447
Ret 16 Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Turvey Flag of the United Kingdom NIO Formula E Team 32 Collision 0:53.407
Ret 11 Flag of Brazil Lucas di Grassi FanBoosticon Flag of Germany Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler 31 Collision 0:52.906
Ret 48 Flag of Switzerland Edoardo Mortara Flag of Monaco Venturi Formula E Team 29 Damage 0:52.791
Ret 6 Flag of Germany Maximilian Günther Flag of the United States GEOX DRAGON 29 Damage 0:53.153
Source:[7]
  • FanBoosticon Indicates a driver was awarded FanBoost during the race.
  • * Sims was handed a five place grid penalty for the Berlin E-Prix for causing a collision.[13]
  • Abt was awarded a 33 second time penalty (converted from a drive through) for causing a collision.[14]
  • Bird was still classified despite retiring as he had completed 90% of the race distance.[7]
  • § Frijns was still classified despite retiring as he had completed 90% of the race distance.[7] He was also awarded a five second grid penalty for the Berlin E-Prix for causing a collision.[14]
  • ƒ da Costa was disqualified from the race for using more than the permitted amount of power (228 kW instead of 225 kW).[14]

Milestones

Standings

Jean-Éric Vergne shot to the top of the Championship after his second victory of the campaign, moving onto 87 points with four races to go. That left him a point ahead of teammate André Lotterer after post-race penalties re-jigged the order, while Robin Frijns slumped to third, six off the lead. António Félix da Costa was next, having lost ground after his post-race disqualification, while Lucas di Grassi retained his spot in the top five.

DS Techeetah extended their lead in the Teams Championship to 38 points after the Monaco E-Prix, with their two drivers atop the Drivers Championship. Envision Virgin were still second, having failed to score, with a similar fate befalling their suppliers Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler. Mahindra Racing were next, having gained a little ground on those ahead, while Nissan e.Dams moved into the top five at the expense of BMW Andretti.

2018/19 Drivers Championship
Pos. Name Pts. +/-
1st Flag of France Jean-Éric Vergne 87 ▲5
2nd Flag of Germany André Lotterer 86 ◄0
3rd Dutch Flag Robin Frijns 81 ▼2
4th Flag of Portugal António Félix da Costa 70 ▼1
5th Flag of Brazil Lucas di Grassi 70 ▼1
6th Flag of New Zealand Mitch Evans 69 ▲1
7th Flag of Belgium Jérôme d'Ambrosio 65 ▼2
8th Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Rowland 59 ▲4
9th Flag of Germany Daniel Abt 59 ▼1
10th Flag of the United Kingdom Sam Bird 54 ▼1
11th Flag of Switzerland Edoardo Mortara 52 ▼1
12th Flag of Germany Pascal Wehrlein 51 ▼1
13th Flag of Switzerland Sébastien Buemi 40 ◄0
14th Flag of Brazil Felipe Massa 32 ▲2
15th Flag of Belgium Stoffel Vandoorne 20 ▼1
16th Flag of the United Kingdom Alexander Sims 18 ▼1
17th Flag of Germany Maximilian Günther 10 ◄0
18th Flag of the United Kingdom Gary Paffett 8 ◄0
19th Flag of the United Kingdom Oliver Turvey 6 ◄0
20th Flag of the United Kingdom Alex Lynn 4 ▲3
21st Flag of Argentina José María López 3 ▼1
22nd Flag of Brazil Nelson Piquet Jr. 1 ▼1
2018/19 Teams Championship
Pos. Name Pts. +/-
1st Flag of China DS Techeetah 173 ◄0
2nd Flag of the United Kingdom Envision Virgin Racing 135 ◄0
3rd Flag of Germany Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler 129 ◄0
4th Flag of India Mahindra Racing 116 ◄0
5th Flag of France Nissan e.Dams 99 ▲2
6th Flag of the United States BMW i Andretti Motorsport 88 ▼1
7th Flag of Monaco Venturi Formula E Team 84 ▼1
8th Flag of the United Kingdom Jaguar Racing 74 ◄0
9th Flag of Germany HWA Racelab 28 ◄0
10th Flag of the United States GEOX DRAGON 13 ◄0
11th Flag of the United Kingdom NIO Formula E Team 6 ◄0

Only point scoring drivers and teams are shown.

References

Videos and Images:

References:
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 'ABB FIA Formula E Championship Season 5', info.fiaformulae.com, (FIA Formula E, 07/06/2018), http://info.fiaformulae.com/season-5-calendar/, (Accessed 07/06/2018)
  2. 2.0 2.1 Alex Kalinauckas, 'Formula E's plans to use Monaco F1 layout set to fall through', motorsport.com, (Motorsport Network, 26/09/2018), https://www.motorsport.com/formula-e/news/formula-es-plans-to-use-monaco-f1-layout-set-to-fall-through/3183758/, (Accessed 30/04/2019)
  3. 3.0 3.1 'Rowland claims Julius Baer Pole Position but JEV to start on Pole in Monaco', fiaformulae.com, (FIA Formula E, 11/05/2019), https://www.fiaformulae.com/en/news/2019/may/qualifying-monaco-2019, (Accessed 12/05/2019)
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 'Vergne masters Monaco while Massa claims maiden Formula E podium ', fiaformulae.com, (FIA Formula E, 11/05/2019), https://www.fiaformulae.com/en/news/2019/may/race-report-monaco-2019, (Accessed 12/05/2019)
  5. Scott Mitchell, 'Formula E set to use full Monaco GP circuit', motorsport.com, (Motorsport Network, 07/03/2018), https://www.motorsport.com/formula-e/news/fe-set-to-use-full-monaco-gp-circuit-1012182/1394922/, (Accessed 30/04/2019)
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 Sam Smith, 'REVEALED: Formula E Set to Become World Championship', e-racing365.com, (John Dagys Media, LLC., 29/04/2019), https://e-racing365.com/formula-e/formula-e-set-to-become-world-championship/, (Accessed 30/04/2019)
  7. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named Results
  8. 8.00 8.01 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 8.11 8.12 8.13 8.14 'Monaco pre-race round-up: Mr Monaco 'not thinking about past,' Venturi seek second podium at home & madness in Monte Carlo ', fiaformulae.com, (FIA Formula E, 10/05/2019), https://www.fiaformulae.com/en/news/2019/may/pre-race-round-up-monaco-2019, (Accessed 12/05/2019)
  9. 9.00 9.01 9.02 9.03 9.04 9.05 9.06 9.07 9.08 9.09 9.10 9.11 9.12 9.13 9.14 9.15 9.16 9.17 9.18 9.19 9.20 9.21 9.22 9.23 9.24 9.25 9.26 9.27 9.28 9.29 ABB Formula E, '2019 Monaco E-Prix - Qualifying LIVE! | ABB FIA Formula E Championship', youtube.com, (YouTube: FIA Formula E, 11/05/2019), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Im3Ks8R3b0k, (Accessed 16/07/2019)
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 Alex Kalinauckas, 'Evans loses Monaco E-Prix front-row start', motorsport.com, (Motorsport Network, 11/05/2019), https://www.motorsport.com/formula-e/news/evans-loses-monaco-front-row/4385979/, (Accessed 12/05/2019)
  11. Tom Errington; Alex Kalinauckas, 'Mass Monaco grid penalties handed down after Paris crashfest', motorsport.com, (Motorsport Network, 28/04/2019), https://www.motorsport.com/formula-e/news/monaco-grid-penalties-paris-crashfest/4377345/, (Accessed 28/04/2019)
  12. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named RH
  13. 'Round 9 - Monaco ePRIX: Decision 8', fiaformulae.alkamelsystems.com, (FIA Formula E, 11/05/2019), http://fiaformulae.alkamelsystems.com/notice-board.html, (Accessed 12/05/2019)
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 Jake Kilshaw, 'Da Costa, Abt Penalized After Monaco E-Prix', e-racing365.com, (John Dagys Media, LLC., 11/05/2019), https://e-racing365.com/formula-e/da-costa-abt-penalized-after-monaco-e-prix/, (Accessed 12/05/2019)
2018/19 ABB FIA Formula E Championship
Entrants
Audi Sport ABT SchaefflerBMW i Andretti MotorsportDS TecheetahEnvision Virgin RacingGEOX DRAGONHWA RacelabMahindra RacingNIO Formula E TeamNissan e.DamsPanasonic Jaguar RacingVenturi Formula E Team
Manufacturers
AudiBMWDSJaguarMahindra & MahindraNIONissanPenskeVenturi
Cars
Spark SRT05e
Audi e-tron FE05BMW iFE.18DS E-Tense FE 19Jaguar I-Type IIIMahindra M5ElectroNIO Sport 004Nissan IM01Penske EV-3Venturi VFE 05
Drivers
2 Sam Bird • 3 Nelson Piquet Jr./Alex Lynn • 4 Robin Frijns • 5 Stoffel Vandoorne • 6 Maximilian Günther/Felipe Nasr • 7 José María López • 8 Tom Dillmann • 11 Lucas di Grassi • 16 Oliver Turvey • 17 Gary Paffett • 19 Felipe Massa • 20 Mitch Evans • 22 Oliver Rowland • 23 Sébastien Buemi • 25 Jean-Éric Vergne • 27 Alexander Sims • 28 António Félix da Costa • 36 André Lotterer • 48 Edoardo Mortara • 64 Jérôme d'Ambrosio • 66 Daniel Abt • 94 Pascal Wehrlein/Felix Rosenqvist
E-Prix
Ad DiriyahMarrakechSantiagoMexico CityHong KongSanyaRomeParisMonacoBerlinBernNew York City INew York City II
Tests
ValenciaAd DiriyahRookie TestMexico City
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